Cowboy Coffee

Cooking Cowboy Coffee

cowboy coffee

Cowboy Coffee

Have you ever returned to hunting camp after a long day of hunting in nasty weather? If so you know how good a cup of cowboy coffee can be by a warm campfire? Do you remember just how good it taste? Sure you do and if your like me I always thought it just taste good because of the long cold day and the atmosphere of the camp. Well it might help with the taste of your cowboy coffee for sure, but I just learned recently that there’s something to that great tasting campfire coffee.

Cowboy coffee has been around a long time. It was used in cowboy camps along the trail and still is a simple way to cook coffee in camp. I can remember climbing mountains to hunt bear and blacktails in Southeast Alaska. If you have ever been to Southeast Alaska you know how much it rains and it is cold in those mountains, even in the summer. I could go most of the day without eating, but I always had a blue speckled cup, a ziploc of coffee and another with sugar. When it was dry enough, which was rarely, I would build a small fire overlooking a bowl or bluff with a creek below and boil me a cup of cowboy coffee. When it was wet or raining, which was often, I would hunker down under an alder thicket and get out my trusted sterno stove.

Brewing Your Brew

Whether you cook your coffee in a blue speckled cup or a pot on a campfire the effects are the same. Get your water warm and add your grounds. Amount per your preference. Now bring the water to a boil and let it roll those grounds for a minute or two. This rolling boil really churns the grounds washing them in the process boiling the acid sending it into the air with the steam.

Remember my mention of how great cowboy coffee taste just because you were cold and wet. Well according to Cowboy Kent Rollins the heat from boiling the grounds is why cowboy coffee taste so good. It removes the acid in the coffee leaving a clean smooth waker upper, warmer upper for you and your campsite friends. Take a look at Cowboy Kent’s great video explaining the long lost art of brewing cowboy coffee.

 

About Ken McBroom 216 Articles
Ken McBroom is an accomplished outdoor writer and photographer. Growing up in Lynchburg Tennessee allowed him many opportunities afield as a boy and young man. Later in life, after Desert Storm, Ken’s wanderlust took him to Alaska to live and work and experience the last frontier. Married now with two beautiful children, Ken now calls Kentucky home where he continues to communicate our American outdoor traditions and the lifestyle it offers.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.




This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.